Local Attractions...

The Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod has put the town of Llangollen on the map, and draws in thousands of visitors to the town, many of whom now return year after year, not only for the Eisteddfod, but to enjoy some of the other attractions the town offers.

The Chainbridge Hotel is uniquely positioned by the River Dee and makes the perfect place to relax and unwind, but if you fancy exploring then the surrounding area has a huge amount to offer for all guests.

Llangollen is a wonderful market town, less than two miles from the hotel, and its steam railway and horse-drawn canal boats are very popular with visitors to the area. There are a number of independent shops, cafes, pubs and restaurants in the town centre. The Chainbridge Hotel is ideally located for those visiting the world famous Llangollen International Eisteddfod, which is held every July - drawing up to 80,000 visitors to the area.

Designated as a World Heritage Site, the area has much to offer, and we have selected a few of the most popular attractions below:


Chirk Castle

Completed in 1310, Chirk is the last Welsh castle from the reign of Edward I that's still lived in today. Features from its 700 years include the medieval tower and dungeon, 17th-century Long Gallery, grand 18th-century state apartments, servants' hall and historic laundry. The award-winning gardens contain clipped yews, herbaceous borders, shrub and rock gardens. A terrace with stunning views looks out over the Cheshire and Salop plains. The parkland provides a habitat for rare invertebrates, wild flowers and contains many mature trees and also some splendid wrought-iron gates, made in 1719 by the Davies brothers.

 

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Chirk Castle

Llangollen International Eisteddfod

Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod is more than a renowned choral music festival. It is a celebration of music, dance, costume and culture from nations around the world.

 

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Llangollen International Eisteddfod

Llangollen Railway

Llangollen Railway is primarily a steam hauled Heritage Railway Line starting at Llangollen Station, located beside the Dee River Bridge, in Llangollen Town, the journey continues for 7 miles upstream, following the River Dee to the village of Carrog. The Dee is classed as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) for its entire length.

 

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Llangollen Railway

Llangollen Wharf

Llangollen Wharf is one of the major attractions in the North Wales market town of Llangollen and is now part of a World Heritage Site. From the Wharf you can embark on either a horse drawn boat trip along the feeder for the main canal, or a motorised aqueduct boat trip which takes you across the famous Pontcysyllte Aqueduct built by Thomas Telford. Both these trips take in the magical sights and sounds of the beautiful Llangollen Canal.

 

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Llangollen Wharf

Plas Newydd

Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Sarah Ponsonby captured the imagination of Regency society. They received a stream of visitors to the unpretentious little cottage which, over the years, they transformed into a Gothic fantasy of projecting stained glass and elaborately carved oak. Inside Plas Newydd today, an exhibition including some of their possessions and an audio tour bring their story to vivid life. You can stroll through their gardens and along their riverside walk. And you can take tea, as Wordsworth, Sir Walter Scott and the Duke of Wellington have all done before you.

 

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Plas Newydd

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

Pontcysyllte is a navigable aqueduct that carries the Llangollen Canal over the valley of the River Dee in Wrexham County Borough in north east Wales. Completed in 1805, it is the longest and highest aqueduct in Britain, a Grade I Listed Building and a World Heritage Site.

 

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Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

Valle Crucis Abbey

Valle Crucis Abbey (Valley of the Cross) is a Cistercian abbey located in Llantysilio in Denbighshire, Wales, not far from The Chainbridge Hotel. The abbey was built in 1201 by Madog ap Gruffydd Maelor, Prince of Powys Fadog. Valle Crucis was dissolved in 1537 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and subsequently fell into serious disrepair. The building is now a ruin, though large parts of the original structure still survive. Valle Crucis Abbey is now under the care of Cadw.

 

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Valle Crucis Abbey